The Pit Stop. #4

The digital industry is filled with Sherpas, gurus and ninjas all vying for your attention. But let’s be honest, we don’t have time to read 1,000-word think pieces all day.

We need digestible information and we want it now, while our train is struggling with a rainy day in Stoke or while we wait for the office’s microwave queue to disappear.

That’s why The Pit Stop exists to bring you a digital digest tackling the frequently asked questions we receive from our clients in 100 words or less.

But anyway, you’re not here for me, you’re here for them, the experts. So, let’s break away from the digital rat race and take a moment with The Pit Stop #4.

Today’s questions include:

 


 

Why should I focus on content marketing as well as direct response?

Daniel Gripton – Head of Content

I was in Rhodes last month, looking for somewhere to eat. Most of the restaurants had greeters outside, but one café that didn’t was packed with tourists and locals.

I couldn’t work out why. The location, branding and menu weren’t special, and it wasn’t near #1 on Google or TripAdvisor.

Then I saw it. On a chalkboard by the entrance.

Useful phrases:
No thank you = Ochi efcharistó
I’m not hungry = Den peináo
Leave me alone = Ase me ísycho

You don’t always have to sell to sell. Sometimes it just takes a bit of empathy, creativity and fun.

 

Can browser updates affect my website?

Beth Jarratt – Client Support Specialist

Chrome and Firefox updated their browsers up to 8 times each in 2017. This typically includes user interface, speed and security updates but each one could mean changes to how they interpret code which could ‘break’ some elements of your site.

Some of the most common causes of downtime span from DNS issues to more malevolent DDoS attacks. It doesn’t always have to be down to human error, these things can just happen.

To prepare, I’d suggest signing up to our support desk, so when downtime does occur, you have a team of experts waiting to help.

 

How much work goes into a website change?

Chris Johnson – Project Manager

When making a change to a website’s design or functionality there are multiple factors to take into consideration. What might seem like a small change to the frontend, could be a major change within the code.  

Compare it to having your car’s clutch replaced. You don’t see the entire mechanism, all you see is the pedal. However, the functionality controlled by the clutch is a major part of the car and needs extensive testing before being allowed back on the road.

Making changes to a website is similar, we need to make sure that everything is functioning before going live.

 

Where is my traffic coming from?

Stephanie Tabah – Marketing Manager

Believe me, I know how hectic things can get and it’s easy to focus on just getting stuff done without so much as a backward glance. As long as things are going great then who cares, right?

Wrong.

Instead of rushing around jumping from one thing to the next, dedicate some time to look at your analytics and assess what’s working for your company. Doing so can give you valuable insights into how your website attracts new audiences, engages existing ones and where your biggest returns are coming from.

 


 

If you have something on your mind or want to read a specialist’s perspective on the work they do, why not help to shape future editions of The Pit Stop? Tweet us your questions, reactions or requests @VennDigital.

Until next time.

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